Princeton’s Paul Robeson Center to host psychiatry lecture June 2

The natural role of the father and the serious consequences of its dwindling importance in society today will be explored on Saturday, June 2 by board-certified psychiatrist, Peter Crist, M.D. during his presentation “Fathers: A Forgotten Natural Role” at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The increase of literal “fatherless homes” where a father is not physically present is a serious problem as evidenced by a significant body of research showing devastatingly disturbing statistics. However, Dr. Crist will also address the even more prevalent functional loss of the role of the father where the father is relegated to generic caregiver, fails to make real genuine emotional contact with his children and abdicates his natural role as an authority only to become merely a “buddy.” Through examples from his clinical practice, personal life, and examples from popular culture, Dr. Crist will illustrate how the loss of the natural role of the father is a major aspect of the breakdown and dysfunction in society that is affecting not only the United States but also many other parts of the world.

Dr. Crist graduated from U.C.L.A. with an A.B. in Zoology and an M.D. degree. He is board certified in psychiatry, internal medicine, and medical orgonomy. Dr. Crist is in private practice in Ringoes, New Jersey where he treats infants, children, adults, couples, and families. Dr. Crist is president of the American College of Orgonomy (ACO), a non-profit, educational and scientific organization. He is on the faculty of the ACO training program for medical orgonomists and is chairman of their social orgonomy training committee. He has spoken in the U.S. and abroad on a wide range of topics as well as published numerous articles in the Journal of Orgonomy.

Admission is free thanks to underwriting support. Donations are welcome. Suggested adult, non-student donation is $45. Reservations are recommended. Call (732) 821-1144 or make your reservation online by visiting www.orgonomy.org.